Spring a poem by edna st vincent millay

Spring a poem by edna st vincent millay

That poem describes autumn, which is the season before the "death" of winter, as a season of great beauty while, ironically, in this poem, spring, the season traditionally seen as a time of rebirth, is instead associated with ideas about death. Or sigh for flowers? Vincent Millay, "God's World," where different language is used to comment on another aspect of nature, and express a different state of mind. Startled, I raised my head,—and with a shout Laid hold upon the latch,—and was without. I have been heated in thy fires, Bent by thy hands, fashioned to thy desires, Thy mark is on me! Heavy it was, and low And dark,—a way by which none e'er would go That other exit had, and never knock Was heard thereat,—bearing a curious lock Some chance had shown me fashioned faultily, Whereof Life held content the useless key, And great coarse hinges, thick and rough with rust, Whose sudden voice across a silence must, I knew, be harsh and horrible to hear,— A strange door, ugly like a dwarf. Better a perilous journey overseas Away from thee, than this, the life I lead, To sit all day in the sunshine like a weed That grows to naught,—I love thee more than they Who serve thee most; yet serve thee in no way. Dost thou love song? A splendour hung Upon the walls, and such sweet songs were sung As, echoing out of very long ago, Had called me from the house of Life, I know. My fairest gardens stand Open as fields to thee on every hand. I am not the same Nor ever more shall be, as when I came. And the next day I called; and on the third Asked them if I might go,—but no one heard. The poem enhances this sense of horror by describing the new life of spring in a way that calls up ideas of violence and death. Edna St. So fair their raiment shone I looked in shame On the unlovely garb in which I came; Then straightway at my hesitancy mocked: "It is my father's house!

There in the night I came, And found them feasting, and all things the same As they had been before. And this thou didst deny, calling my name Insistently, until I rose and came.

Then, sick with longing, I arose at last And went unto my father,—in that vast Chamber wherein he for so many years Has sat, surrounded by his charts and spheres. My own, my own, My own to touch, my own to taste and smell, All I had lacked so long and loved so well!

Dost thou love song?

spring by edna st vincent millay quizlet

The poem refuses to participate in the lie and instead depicts death with a graphic and repulsive image. Father, I beg of thee a little task To dignify my days,—'tis all I ask Forever, but forever, this denied, I perish.

I know not when the wonder came to me Of what my father's business might be, And whither fared and on what errands bent The tall and gracious messengers he sent. Vincent Millay. So fair their raiment shone I looked in shame On the unlovely garb in which I came; Then straightway at my hesitancy mocked: "It is my father's house!

Yet one day with no song from dawn till night Wondering, I sat, and watched them out of sight.

Spring poems

So fair their raiment shone I looked in shame On the unlovely garb in which I came; Then straightway at my hesitancy mocked: "It is my father's house! But the poet, Edna St. Nor threat, nor easy vow Of tardy kindness can avail thee now With me, whence fear and faith alike are flown; Lonely I came, and I depart alone, And know not where nor unto whom I go; But that thou canst not follow me I know. Heavy it was, and low And dark,—a way by which none e'er would go That other exit had, and never knock Was heard thereat,—bearing a curious lock Some chance had shown me fashioned faultily, Whereof Life held content the useless key, And great coarse hinges, thick and rough with rust, Whose sudden voice across a silence must, I knew, be harsh and horrible to hear,— A strange door, ugly like a dwarf. And now I go. But as for tasks—" he smiled, and shook his head; "Thou hadst thy task, and laidst it by," he said. Father, I beg of thee a little task To dignify my days,—'tis all I ask Forever, but forever, this denied, I perish.

Nor threat, nor easy vow Of tardy kindness can avail thee now With me, whence fear and faith alike are flown; Lonely I came, and I depart alone, And know not where nor unto whom I go; But that thou canst not follow me I know.

Thou hast mocked me, starved me, beat my body sore!

Spring by edna st. vincent millay analysis

Nor threat, nor easy vow Of tardy kindness can avail thee now With me, whence fear and faith alike are flown; Lonely I came, and I depart alone, And know not where nor unto whom I go; But that thou canst not follow me I know. And now I go. Vincent Millay. So stood longtime, till over me at last Came weariness, and all things other passed To make it room; the still night drifted deep Like snow about me, and I longed for sleep. Or sigh for flowers? I asked of thee no favor save this one: That thou wouldst leave me playing in the sun! A splendour hung Upon the walls, and such sweet songs were sung As, echoing out of very long ago, Had called me from the house of Life, I know.

And the next day I called; and on the third Asked them if I might go,—but no one heard.

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Spring by Edna St. Vincent Millay